Leica 135 Explorations

Since returning from Paris, I've mainly been exploring medium format film photography. So much so that I found myself shooting more and more with my Hasselblad and less with my Sony A7ii while Sam and I were in Africa. This experiment has continued to help me grow as a photographer and has since evolved in to an exploration of 135 film with the purchase of a Leica M6 and a Leica Summicron-M 50mm f/2.0. I was fortunate to have the opportunity to work with Bellamy Hunt of Japan Camera Hunter in tracking down a near mint condition Leica M6 from the original Leitz Factory. I decided to invest in a new Summircon-M 50mm f/2.0 given that both the M6 and the Sony A7ii mounts will support the lens and it's a piece of glass that I plan to have the rest of my life. Needless to say, this was not a typical purchase for me and it was part of my #30before30 that my dear friend Jimmy Watson often reminds me of.

There are many things that I've learned in a short period of time about shooting film that help me better understand the craftsmanship behind creating a photograph - especially when you're shooting with a Hasselblad 500 c/m or Leica M. That said, I'm not sure I see a use case where I walk away from shooting digital altogether, rather I find myself shooting more of a mix of both formats which manifests in carrying a Sony A7ii and either the Hasselblad or Leica when I'm out creating photographs. One of the most important aspects of shooting film beyond the craftsmanship is the ability to truly focus on the scene resulting in more intimate photographs. Focus in the sense that both the Hasselblad and Leica cameras are so incredibly simple to use and provide only the basic elements required - aperture, shutter speeds and focal distance. Compare these minimalist designs to a camera like the Sony A7ii that have every possible bell and whistle you can image which can be critical in certain low light moments but more often than not provide an overwhelming amount choices and second guessing when in the field. Furthermore, while these cameras are dead simple they're also some of the most beautiful cameras I've used in my life.

Craftsmanship in having to work for my image, focus and simplicity all lead to a more present experience and more intimate photographs which is why I continue to find shooting film more and more rewarding. I've decided to take some time away from my sole remaining social network in Instagram to continue this focus on creating stronger photographs rather than releasing photographs for likes, comments and shares. I'll be releasing a few selects from time to time on my blog, but plan to share a larger body of work in the new year. In the meantime, here are a few of my first photographs with the Leica.

All photographs were created with the Leica M6 and the Leica Summicron-M 50mm f/2.0 on Kodak Portra 400 and Kodak Tri-X 400. All images were scanned and processed by Richard Photo Lab in California.