Creative Exposure

I’ve been working with RPL for a few weeks now, and like any relationship, feel like we’re getting better at understanding each other and how we work. For the record, I’ve been very impressed with their scans from the start, but I believe I’m getting much closer to my preferred exposures. Looking back at my previous post, Explorations in Medium Format, you can see how most of the photograph is washed out and even has a bit of a faded look to it. This is due to human error in measuring the hand metering computations, resulting in an over-exposed photograph by at least four or five stops by my estimation. 

The following photograph is the closest representation to where I’m hoping to find most of my exposures moving forward. I’ve been focusing on refining exposure and hand metering throughout these first few batches of photographs, so while the subject matter may be lacking, the focus is really on finding the appropriate range of exposure that aligns both technically and creatively with my vision.

Hasselblad 500 C/M, Kodak Portra 400, Overexposed 2 stops n an overcast Fall afternoon

Creatively, I love how this photograph has a decent amount of contrast and has a rich saturation to it. Unlike the first few posts, this photograph doesn't appear to suffer some of the previously noted downsides like blown out highlights, slightly faded subject matter, and too bright of an image overall. I also really enjoy how well the Zeiss 80mm Planar T* f/2.8 singles out the subject matter when shot wide open at f/2.8. In addition to tack-sharp focus, the bokeh rivals that of the Sony Sonnar T* FE 55mm f/1.8 ZA which has been rated one of the two best (and sharpest) auto-focus lenses available today. Overall, it's impressive that such an old camera still competes, and in some ways still exceeds, modern digital technology.

And I often have to remind myself, it's not just the camera technology. I can’t stress how amazed I am by out of the camera color profile of Fujifilm 400H and Kodak Portra 400. In fact, I find myself struggling to decide if I should shoot with Fujifilm or Portra as both have their strengths and weaknesses but more on that later. The color profiles in combination with the Hasselblad’s bokeh and tack-sharp focus leaves little to be desired and further solidifies the 500 c/m as one of the most rewarding and intimate photographic experiences I’ve had in my life. Now, back to shooting before we're snowed in for the next four months.

All images were taken with the Hasselblad 500 C/M and the Carl Zeiss 80mm Planar T* f/2.8 on Kodak Portra 400. All images were scanned and processed by Richard Photo Lab in California.